Bad Dog #2

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Mar 2009 | Image

Writing: Joe Kelly
Art: Diego Greco
Letters: Thomas Mauer
Cover: Diego Greco

River Rocks

Wendell’s a bit of a sad puppy haunted by the missing milk carton children. His mood lightens when the two round up some white supremacist punks. Like last time, things end up messy and the two return empty handed-again.

I just have to say that woman they get their jobs from gives me more than the creeps. That lady is disturbing, especially the way she torments Wendell with her desires. This issue’s dose of her went well beyond the previous issue.

What the two of them did to those white supremacists was a bit of a shocker, giving them a dose of their own medicine. It really shows how this book isn’t pulling any punches when it comes to mature and offensive content. Still, it was amusing, particularly the how they lost their prey. I’m starting to see a wonderful trend here.

I can’t help but feel strangely guilty for liking this book. I’m not sure if it’s because I find all the offensive content amusing, or perhaps that that may be the primary reason I like it. I know I shouldn’t feel this way. I’ve read far more disturbing things over the years and it didn’t bother me in the least. It’s probably from those Jehovah Witnesses that came by this morning. They must have thrown off all my karma and stuff.

Shoving aside the guilt, I can’t wait to see more of our off-colour pair. They’re such a believable pair and so perfect for each other. It’s really hard picturing either of them any different.

I’m so glad I picked up that first issue on a whim, else I would have seriously missed out on some excellent stuff.

Bad Dog #1

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Feb 2009 | Image

Writing: Joe Kelly
Art: Diego Greco
Letters: Thomas Mauer
Cover: Diego Greco

Old Monster, New Tricks

Lou and Wendell are not your typical bounty hunters. Lou is a Werewolf who refuses to take a human form our of his disgust of people. Wendell is an ex-preacher with anger issues and a foul mouth. Together, the two of them try their best to catch criminals, though they’re far from good at it. Stuff, just happens. This time they’re after a pool cleaner having trouble with the IRS.

Wow! This is awesome! I didn’t think I’d get into it, but it grabbed me from the get go when Lou’s stolen car breaks down in the Arizona desert and he rants about how evil SUVs are. I also liked the scene at the bar where Wendell talks with that Navy veteran. There’s a lot of good comedy in this book and it does have it’s serious moments so perfectly executed, they don’t break up the humor or feel out-of-place.

The characters are well designed and thought out. I like how even though Lou is an ex-preacher, he still has a few religious bones in his body and it almost makes me wonder if God really cares. He is, technically a good guy trying to bring in the bad. So what if he likes his booze, swearing, and does a few questionable things at times? And Wendell seems to bear the most empathy between the two. Most notable are his reactions to the missing children on the backs of milk cartons and how he tries to talk his mark down towards the end, not being a heartless jerk like most typical bounty hunters.

I’m really impressed with the story, actually. There’s a lot going on besides the two of them trying to make a living. There’s some colourful back story we get small glimpses of, that provide a bit more light on our heroes lives. And there’s also the mater of how they seem to fail and how it seems like bad luck is just another freak accident.

Take all this stuff I like and combine it with Diego Greco’s wonderful art and it’s guaranteed a slot on my pull list. I really can’t wait to see where the story goes, particularly this eerie, sorrowful focus on milk cartons. I also hope to learn more about our two characters pasts and what other troubles they find themselves in.

This is well on it’s way to earning a top spot on my reading list.

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